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Things You Only Hear People Say on Black Friday

Things You Only Hear People Say on Black Friday

After preparing all month, getting your list together (and checking it twice), and gathering with loved ones, the big November holiday is finally here: Black Friday. Thanksgiving may be the day for being grateful and giving thanks, but how can you be grateful for things you don’t even have yet? Exactly.

So, as you gear up to go fight the crowds (figuratively and literally) and get those bargains, keep an open ear for these phrases. You’ll only hear them on Black Friday, after all, and it comes but once a year.

“Alright, when we get in the store I want you to sprint straight back to electronics.”

This is the game plan. Put those high school track days to good use and do not disappoint me.

“Are you doing rainchecks?”

The answer is no. It will always be no. So don’t even ask.

I’m never doing this again. I swear this is the last time.”

She said it last year, too. And she’ll be back again next year.

“I only waited in line for an hour and a half. It wasn’t bad at all!”

The line was wrapped all the way around the Toys R Us, but it moved surprisingly quickly!

“I wish they would start doing this on Friday again.”

Says the man standing in line outside of Best Buy at 3 p.m. on Thursday anyway…

“So, how long have you been camping out?”

“I’ve been here since noon. I had to miss out on the entire Thanksgiving dinner, but I really want to get some $2 pajamas.”

“There’s no need to shove. You’ll all get your Hatchables.”

Now, you may not get this year’s hottest toys at the same time, but you will get one eventually. Please don’t hurt each other. The employees are exhausted and cannot break up your fights.

“We got a late start this morning. We slept in until 2 a.m.”

Slackers… With deals starting as early as 3 p.m. on Thanksgiving Day itself, if you’re not out shopping before midnight, you may as well not go at all.


Politically Correct Term For Black People

I'm sorry if I'm repeating the topic, but I tried searching and got hundreds of results, and none in the first couple of pages were relevant.

I am an English student from Bosnia and Herzegovina (south-east Europe), and I'm writing a paper on politically correctness, so I need thoughts from Americans.

It is my opinion that "African American" is not precise. It is limited to citizens of America with African heritage. What about black people in other countries in the world? What about black Americans from Cuba, the Carribeans and so on? "Black people" encompasses all those groups.
Can anyone tell me if it is offensive to use "black person/people", and if so, what is the accepted term which would denote the whole group.

Do you know the expression about a pendulum swinging back after it was swung completely one way?

There was a time when only "African-American" would do. My children have been taught that, to the point they don't know any other term - making it absurd when we were in another part of the world and they used the term there.

There are mixed opinions among those with darker skin themselves as to what to call themselves. Some will say Blacks with a capital b, some will say black wih a lower-case b, and some will prefer to use only African-American. One of my daughters has - for the first time - a black teacher and she seems to be teacher a bit more than math, which is great considering you can count the number of black kids in their elementry school on one hand. (Maybe two hands, I haven't actually tried to do it.) It seems Miss R uses the term "black people" for her 9-year-old students.

My good friend at work is black. I don't often find it necessary to refer to race, but I use "black" with her. I would use "African-American" with someone I didn't know very well, so it seems that's still the most politically correct form.

However, the black experience in the US has historically been a very different experience than in other places, so I don't see a problem having two phrases, one for the US and one for other places. if you really felt that you had to be sensitive and wanted to refer to places other than the US, then use "those of African descent."

(Note that simply "Africans" implies that they or their parents are from the US - to be an "African-American" implies generations have been here. Probably more generations than most white Americans.)

You will not fine ONE term that is always right. You will find many terms that are always wrong, however. "Colored" is considered an old-fashioned term and slighly prejudiced. Negro sounds like you're from the 1960s. And the "n-word" is considered so offensive that many people who use the "f-word" without pause but will never use the n-word.


Politically Correct Term For Black People

I'm sorry if I'm repeating the topic, but I tried searching and got hundreds of results, and none in the first couple of pages were relevant.

I am an English student from Bosnia and Herzegovina (south-east Europe), and I'm writing a paper on politically correctness, so I need thoughts from Americans.

It is my opinion that "African American" is not precise. It is limited to citizens of America with African heritage. What about black people in other countries in the world? What about black Americans from Cuba, the Carribeans and so on? "Black people" encompasses all those groups.
Can anyone tell me if it is offensive to use "black person/people", and if so, what is the accepted term which would denote the whole group.

Do you know the expression about a pendulum swinging back after it was swung completely one way?

There was a time when only "African-American" would do. My children have been taught that, to the point they don't know any other term - making it absurd when we were in another part of the world and they used the term there.

There are mixed opinions among those with darker skin themselves as to what to call themselves. Some will say Blacks with a capital b, some will say black wih a lower-case b, and some will prefer to use only African-American. One of my daughters has - for the first time - a black teacher and she seems to be teacher a bit more than math, which is great considering you can count the number of black kids in their elementry school on one hand. (Maybe two hands, I haven't actually tried to do it.) It seems Miss R uses the term "black people" for her 9-year-old students.

My good friend at work is black. I don't often find it necessary to refer to race, but I use "black" with her. I would use "African-American" with someone I didn't know very well, so it seems that's still the most politically correct form.

However, the black experience in the US has historically been a very different experience than in other places, so I don't see a problem having two phrases, one for the US and one for other places. if you really felt that you had to be sensitive and wanted to refer to places other than the US, then use "those of African descent."

(Note that simply "Africans" implies that they or their parents are from the US - to be an "African-American" implies generations have been here. Probably more generations than most white Americans.)

You will not fine ONE term that is always right. You will find many terms that are always wrong, however. "Colored" is considered an old-fashioned term and slighly prejudiced. Negro sounds like you're from the 1960s. And the "n-word" is considered so offensive that many people who use the "f-word" without pause but will never use the n-word.


Politically Correct Term For Black People

I'm sorry if I'm repeating the topic, but I tried searching and got hundreds of results, and none in the first couple of pages were relevant.

I am an English student from Bosnia and Herzegovina (south-east Europe), and I'm writing a paper on politically correctness, so I need thoughts from Americans.

It is my opinion that "African American" is not precise. It is limited to citizens of America with African heritage. What about black people in other countries in the world? What about black Americans from Cuba, the Carribeans and so on? "Black people" encompasses all those groups.
Can anyone tell me if it is offensive to use "black person/people", and if so, what is the accepted term which would denote the whole group.

Do you know the expression about a pendulum swinging back after it was swung completely one way?

There was a time when only "African-American" would do. My children have been taught that, to the point they don't know any other term - making it absurd when we were in another part of the world and they used the term there.

There are mixed opinions among those with darker skin themselves as to what to call themselves. Some will say Blacks with a capital b, some will say black wih a lower-case b, and some will prefer to use only African-American. One of my daughters has - for the first time - a black teacher and she seems to be teacher a bit more than math, which is great considering you can count the number of black kids in their elementry school on one hand. (Maybe two hands, I haven't actually tried to do it.) It seems Miss R uses the term "black people" for her 9-year-old students.

My good friend at work is black. I don't often find it necessary to refer to race, but I use "black" with her. I would use "African-American" with someone I didn't know very well, so it seems that's still the most politically correct form.

However, the black experience in the US has historically been a very different experience than in other places, so I don't see a problem having two phrases, one for the US and one for other places. if you really felt that you had to be sensitive and wanted to refer to places other than the US, then use "those of African descent."

(Note that simply "Africans" implies that they or their parents are from the US - to be an "African-American" implies generations have been here. Probably more generations than most white Americans.)

You will not fine ONE term that is always right. You will find many terms that are always wrong, however. "Colored" is considered an old-fashioned term and slighly prejudiced. Negro sounds like you're from the 1960s. And the "n-word" is considered so offensive that many people who use the "f-word" without pause but will never use the n-word.


Politically Correct Term For Black People

I'm sorry if I'm repeating the topic, but I tried searching and got hundreds of results, and none in the first couple of pages were relevant.

I am an English student from Bosnia and Herzegovina (south-east Europe), and I'm writing a paper on politically correctness, so I need thoughts from Americans.

It is my opinion that "African American" is not precise. It is limited to citizens of America with African heritage. What about black people in other countries in the world? What about black Americans from Cuba, the Carribeans and so on? "Black people" encompasses all those groups.
Can anyone tell me if it is offensive to use "black person/people", and if so, what is the accepted term which would denote the whole group.

Do you know the expression about a pendulum swinging back after it was swung completely one way?

There was a time when only "African-American" would do. My children have been taught that, to the point they don't know any other term - making it absurd when we were in another part of the world and they used the term there.

There are mixed opinions among those with darker skin themselves as to what to call themselves. Some will say Blacks with a capital b, some will say black wih a lower-case b, and some will prefer to use only African-American. One of my daughters has - for the first time - a black teacher and she seems to be teacher a bit more than math, which is great considering you can count the number of black kids in their elementry school on one hand. (Maybe two hands, I haven't actually tried to do it.) It seems Miss R uses the term "black people" for her 9-year-old students.

My good friend at work is black. I don't often find it necessary to refer to race, but I use "black" with her. I would use "African-American" with someone I didn't know very well, so it seems that's still the most politically correct form.

However, the black experience in the US has historically been a very different experience than in other places, so I don't see a problem having two phrases, one for the US and one for other places. if you really felt that you had to be sensitive and wanted to refer to places other than the US, then use "those of African descent."

(Note that simply "Africans" implies that they or their parents are from the US - to be an "African-American" implies generations have been here. Probably more generations than most white Americans.)

You will not fine ONE term that is always right. You will find many terms that are always wrong, however. "Colored" is considered an old-fashioned term and slighly prejudiced. Negro sounds like you're from the 1960s. And the "n-word" is considered so offensive that many people who use the "f-word" without pause but will never use the n-word.


Politically Correct Term For Black People

I'm sorry if I'm repeating the topic, but I tried searching and got hundreds of results, and none in the first couple of pages were relevant.

I am an English student from Bosnia and Herzegovina (south-east Europe), and I'm writing a paper on politically correctness, so I need thoughts from Americans.

It is my opinion that "African American" is not precise. It is limited to citizens of America with African heritage. What about black people in other countries in the world? What about black Americans from Cuba, the Carribeans and so on? "Black people" encompasses all those groups.
Can anyone tell me if it is offensive to use "black person/people", and if so, what is the accepted term which would denote the whole group.

Do you know the expression about a pendulum swinging back after it was swung completely one way?

There was a time when only "African-American" would do. My children have been taught that, to the point they don't know any other term - making it absurd when we were in another part of the world and they used the term there.

There are mixed opinions among those with darker skin themselves as to what to call themselves. Some will say Blacks with a capital b, some will say black wih a lower-case b, and some will prefer to use only African-American. One of my daughters has - for the first time - a black teacher and she seems to be teacher a bit more than math, which is great considering you can count the number of black kids in their elementry school on one hand. (Maybe two hands, I haven't actually tried to do it.) It seems Miss R uses the term "black people" for her 9-year-old students.

My good friend at work is black. I don't often find it necessary to refer to race, but I use "black" with her. I would use "African-American" with someone I didn't know very well, so it seems that's still the most politically correct form.

However, the black experience in the US has historically been a very different experience than in other places, so I don't see a problem having two phrases, one for the US and one for other places. if you really felt that you had to be sensitive and wanted to refer to places other than the US, then use "those of African descent."

(Note that simply "Africans" implies that they or their parents are from the US - to be an "African-American" implies generations have been here. Probably more generations than most white Americans.)

You will not fine ONE term that is always right. You will find many terms that are always wrong, however. "Colored" is considered an old-fashioned term and slighly prejudiced. Negro sounds like you're from the 1960s. And the "n-word" is considered so offensive that many people who use the "f-word" without pause but will never use the n-word.


Politically Correct Term For Black People

I'm sorry if I'm repeating the topic, but I tried searching and got hundreds of results, and none in the first couple of pages were relevant.

I am an English student from Bosnia and Herzegovina (south-east Europe), and I'm writing a paper on politically correctness, so I need thoughts from Americans.

It is my opinion that "African American" is not precise. It is limited to citizens of America with African heritage. What about black people in other countries in the world? What about black Americans from Cuba, the Carribeans and so on? "Black people" encompasses all those groups.
Can anyone tell me if it is offensive to use "black person/people", and if so, what is the accepted term which would denote the whole group.

Do you know the expression about a pendulum swinging back after it was swung completely one way?

There was a time when only "African-American" would do. My children have been taught that, to the point they don't know any other term - making it absurd when we were in another part of the world and they used the term there.

There are mixed opinions among those with darker skin themselves as to what to call themselves. Some will say Blacks with a capital b, some will say black wih a lower-case b, and some will prefer to use only African-American. One of my daughters has - for the first time - a black teacher and she seems to be teacher a bit more than math, which is great considering you can count the number of black kids in their elementry school on one hand. (Maybe two hands, I haven't actually tried to do it.) It seems Miss R uses the term "black people" for her 9-year-old students.

My good friend at work is black. I don't often find it necessary to refer to race, but I use "black" with her. I would use "African-American" with someone I didn't know very well, so it seems that's still the most politically correct form.

However, the black experience in the US has historically been a very different experience than in other places, so I don't see a problem having two phrases, one for the US and one for other places. if you really felt that you had to be sensitive and wanted to refer to places other than the US, then use "those of African descent."

(Note that simply "Africans" implies that they or their parents are from the US - to be an "African-American" implies generations have been here. Probably more generations than most white Americans.)

You will not fine ONE term that is always right. You will find many terms that are always wrong, however. "Colored" is considered an old-fashioned term and slighly prejudiced. Negro sounds like you're from the 1960s. And the "n-word" is considered so offensive that many people who use the "f-word" without pause but will never use the n-word.


Politically Correct Term For Black People

I'm sorry if I'm repeating the topic, but I tried searching and got hundreds of results, and none in the first couple of pages were relevant.

I am an English student from Bosnia and Herzegovina (south-east Europe), and I'm writing a paper on politically correctness, so I need thoughts from Americans.

It is my opinion that "African American" is not precise. It is limited to citizens of America with African heritage. What about black people in other countries in the world? What about black Americans from Cuba, the Carribeans and so on? "Black people" encompasses all those groups.
Can anyone tell me if it is offensive to use "black person/people", and if so, what is the accepted term which would denote the whole group.

Do you know the expression about a pendulum swinging back after it was swung completely one way?

There was a time when only "African-American" would do. My children have been taught that, to the point they don't know any other term - making it absurd when we were in another part of the world and they used the term there.

There are mixed opinions among those with darker skin themselves as to what to call themselves. Some will say Blacks with a capital b, some will say black wih a lower-case b, and some will prefer to use only African-American. One of my daughters has - for the first time - a black teacher and she seems to be teacher a bit more than math, which is great considering you can count the number of black kids in their elementry school on one hand. (Maybe two hands, I haven't actually tried to do it.) It seems Miss R uses the term "black people" for her 9-year-old students.

My good friend at work is black. I don't often find it necessary to refer to race, but I use "black" with her. I would use "African-American" with someone I didn't know very well, so it seems that's still the most politically correct form.

However, the black experience in the US has historically been a very different experience than in other places, so I don't see a problem having two phrases, one for the US and one for other places. if you really felt that you had to be sensitive and wanted to refer to places other than the US, then use "those of African descent."

(Note that simply "Africans" implies that they or their parents are from the US - to be an "African-American" implies generations have been here. Probably more generations than most white Americans.)

You will not fine ONE term that is always right. You will find many terms that are always wrong, however. "Colored" is considered an old-fashioned term and slighly prejudiced. Negro sounds like you're from the 1960s. And the "n-word" is considered so offensive that many people who use the "f-word" without pause but will never use the n-word.


Politically Correct Term For Black People

I'm sorry if I'm repeating the topic, but I tried searching and got hundreds of results, and none in the first couple of pages were relevant.

I am an English student from Bosnia and Herzegovina (south-east Europe), and I'm writing a paper on politically correctness, so I need thoughts from Americans.

It is my opinion that "African American" is not precise. It is limited to citizens of America with African heritage. What about black people in other countries in the world? What about black Americans from Cuba, the Carribeans and so on? "Black people" encompasses all those groups.
Can anyone tell me if it is offensive to use "black person/people", and if so, what is the accepted term which would denote the whole group.

Do you know the expression about a pendulum swinging back after it was swung completely one way?

There was a time when only "African-American" would do. My children have been taught that, to the point they don't know any other term - making it absurd when we were in another part of the world and they used the term there.

There are mixed opinions among those with darker skin themselves as to what to call themselves. Some will say Blacks with a capital b, some will say black wih a lower-case b, and some will prefer to use only African-American. One of my daughters has - for the first time - a black teacher and she seems to be teacher a bit more than math, which is great considering you can count the number of black kids in their elementry school on one hand. (Maybe two hands, I haven't actually tried to do it.) It seems Miss R uses the term "black people" for her 9-year-old students.

My good friend at work is black. I don't often find it necessary to refer to race, but I use "black" with her. I would use "African-American" with someone I didn't know very well, so it seems that's still the most politically correct form.

However, the black experience in the US has historically been a very different experience than in other places, so I don't see a problem having two phrases, one for the US and one for other places. if you really felt that you had to be sensitive and wanted to refer to places other than the US, then use "those of African descent."

(Note that simply "Africans" implies that they or their parents are from the US - to be an "African-American" implies generations have been here. Probably more generations than most white Americans.)

You will not fine ONE term that is always right. You will find many terms that are always wrong, however. "Colored" is considered an old-fashioned term and slighly prejudiced. Negro sounds like you're from the 1960s. And the "n-word" is considered so offensive that many people who use the "f-word" without pause but will never use the n-word.


Politically Correct Term For Black People

I'm sorry if I'm repeating the topic, but I tried searching and got hundreds of results, and none in the first couple of pages were relevant.

I am an English student from Bosnia and Herzegovina (south-east Europe), and I'm writing a paper on politically correctness, so I need thoughts from Americans.

It is my opinion that "African American" is not precise. It is limited to citizens of America with African heritage. What about black people in other countries in the world? What about black Americans from Cuba, the Carribeans and so on? "Black people" encompasses all those groups.
Can anyone tell me if it is offensive to use "black person/people", and if so, what is the accepted term which would denote the whole group.

Do you know the expression about a pendulum swinging back after it was swung completely one way?

There was a time when only "African-American" would do. My children have been taught that, to the point they don't know any other term - making it absurd when we were in another part of the world and they used the term there.

There are mixed opinions among those with darker skin themselves as to what to call themselves. Some will say Blacks with a capital b, some will say black wih a lower-case b, and some will prefer to use only African-American. One of my daughters has - for the first time - a black teacher and she seems to be teacher a bit more than math, which is great considering you can count the number of black kids in their elementry school on one hand. (Maybe two hands, I haven't actually tried to do it.) It seems Miss R uses the term "black people" for her 9-year-old students.

My good friend at work is black. I don't often find it necessary to refer to race, but I use "black" with her. I would use "African-American" with someone I didn't know very well, so it seems that's still the most politically correct form.

However, the black experience in the US has historically been a very different experience than in other places, so I don't see a problem having two phrases, one for the US and one for other places. if you really felt that you had to be sensitive and wanted to refer to places other than the US, then use "those of African descent."

(Note that simply "Africans" implies that they or their parents are from the US - to be an "African-American" implies generations have been here. Probably more generations than most white Americans.)

You will not fine ONE term that is always right. You will find many terms that are always wrong, however. "Colored" is considered an old-fashioned term and slighly prejudiced. Negro sounds like you're from the 1960s. And the "n-word" is considered so offensive that many people who use the "f-word" without pause but will never use the n-word.


Politically Correct Term For Black People

I'm sorry if I'm repeating the topic, but I tried searching and got hundreds of results, and none in the first couple of pages were relevant.

I am an English student from Bosnia and Herzegovina (south-east Europe), and I'm writing a paper on politically correctness, so I need thoughts from Americans.

It is my opinion that "African American" is not precise. It is limited to citizens of America with African heritage. What about black people in other countries in the world? What about black Americans from Cuba, the Carribeans and so on? "Black people" encompasses all those groups.
Can anyone tell me if it is offensive to use "black person/people", and if so, what is the accepted term which would denote the whole group.

Do you know the expression about a pendulum swinging back after it was swung completely one way?

There was a time when only "African-American" would do. My children have been taught that, to the point they don't know any other term - making it absurd when we were in another part of the world and they used the term there.

There are mixed opinions among those with darker skin themselves as to what to call themselves. Some will say Blacks with a capital b, some will say black wih a lower-case b, and some will prefer to use only African-American. One of my daughters has - for the first time - a black teacher and she seems to be teacher a bit more than math, which is great considering you can count the number of black kids in their elementry school on one hand. (Maybe two hands, I haven't actually tried to do it.) It seems Miss R uses the term "black people" for her 9-year-old students.

My good friend at work is black. I don't often find it necessary to refer to race, but I use "black" with her. I would use "African-American" with someone I didn't know very well, so it seems that's still the most politically correct form.

However, the black experience in the US has historically been a very different experience than in other places, so I don't see a problem having two phrases, one for the US and one for other places. if you really felt that you had to be sensitive and wanted to refer to places other than the US, then use "those of African descent."

(Note that simply "Africans" implies that they or their parents are from the US - to be an "African-American" implies generations have been here. Probably more generations than most white Americans.)

You will not fine ONE term that is always right. You will find many terms that are always wrong, however. "Colored" is considered an old-fashioned term and slighly prejudiced. Negro sounds like you're from the 1960s. And the "n-word" is considered so offensive that many people who use the "f-word" without pause but will never use the n-word.