Traditional recipes

Food Arranged Like Famous Paintings

Food Arranged Like Famous Paintings

These works of edible art are masterpieces

Move over Picasso; this is what real art looks like.

Can you believe that this painting of Van Gogh’s sunflowers is made from sushi rolls?

(Noupe.com)

Watch the “Baking of Adam” and be prepared to feel infinitely less proud of your best batch of cookies.

Artist Meaghan Mountford recreates classic paintings on a fluffy marshmallow canvas.

(JeremyRaid.com)

This replication of Andy Warhol’s famous Marilyn Monroe image is made entirely of chocolate Smarties!

(Funcheap/NoeValleyArtContest)

Ida Skivenes, also known as IdaFrosk, replicated several famous paintings in “The Art Toast Project,” in which toasted bread serves as her canvas.

(Artnaz.com/IdaFrosk)


Artists in the Kitchen: Outrageous Food Art

You won't find a paintbrush in Jason Mecier's studio. The mosaic portrait artist's representations of famous faces &mdash including Rosie O'Donnell (at left), Rachael Ray, and Jerry Seinfeld &mdash are made out of candy, potato chips, cookies, and other edible goodies.

During the 2012 election season, Industry of the Ordinary, an organization consisting of artists Adam Brooks and Mathew Wilson, hired artist Bob Kling to carve this bust of President Obama out of unsalted butter. The sculpture was displayed in the President's hometown, Chicago, IL.

Montreal-based artist and film director Cosimo Cavallaro works in many mediums. He's created artistic forms and installations with everything from cheese to ham to candy, but some of his most classical looking pieces are made from chocolate. This sculpture, a piece from his "Sweet Saints" collection, depicts an angel-like figure of incredible detail it's sculpted entirely out of pure chocolate.

A piece that creates meaning through whimsical self-reference, this sculpture of an avid movie-goer is made mainly of a beloved movie theater snack &mdash popcorn.

From a distance, you'd never guess that this incredibly detailed mural is made entirely out of frosting and sugar decorations. But artist Shelley Miller, based in Montreal, travels around the globe creating installations like the edible one pictured here. Many of her pieces are commissioned to enliven public spaces &mdash this particular work was created in March of 2011 on a wall in downtown Victoria, BC.

Most of us think of stains as something that ruin a good tablecloth or favorite dress. But Amelia Fais Harnas turns that preconceived notion on its head, and creates truly amazing art by staining fabrics with red wine. This self-portrait, in which the artist depicts herself drinking a delightful glass of vino, is particularly intimate and detailed. Harnas used a Damiani Vino Rosso, as well as bronze powder and acrylic, to create this image on a piece of cotton fabric.

Kevin Van Aelst constructs unique and provocative pieces out of a wide variety of ordinary, everyday materials, but his works in food are some of his most stunning. This globe, carved out of a common Red Delicious apple, is extraordinarly intricate. It's his ability to take commonplace objects and materials and turn them into something spectacular that makes Kevin Van Aelst's work so appealing.

San Francisco-based artist Jason Mecier &mdash who also made the amazing mosaic portrait of Rosie O'Donnell featured in this collection &mdash is continually coming up with clever new ways to depict our favorite figures in American pop culture. This image of Kevin Bacon is made entirely out of &mdash you guessed it &mdash bacon.

It took more than 250 molds to create this Jell-O geography project in August 2009. To make their showstopping map, designers Bompas & Parr borrowed architectural techniques used to design skyscrapers and tapped into their prior masterpieces: glow-in-the-dark creations and wedding jelly molds.

To create his incredible landscapes, Carl Warner's medium of choice is fruits and vegetables. Fruit Balloons and Cart was inspired by the English countryside and created for a UK supermarket.

This self-taught food sculptor could win a gold medal for patience. Just one squash in his Tempo di Zucche took more than five hours to carve using one carving tool: a stiletto Thai knife.

For 30-year veteran food sculptor Jim Victor, creating the Peanut Brittle House was a piece of, well, almost anything but cake. The sculpted house has peanut brittle walls, fruit roll-up roofing applied with chocolate "cement," licorice candy chimneys, cast sugar windows, taffy mullions, licorice candy steps, fondant doors and shutters, and gumdrop, Gummi bear, and rock candy bushes.

Jimmy Zhang, a graduate of the Culinary Arts Institute in China, has always been fascinated by the ancient art of fruit and vegetable carving. He got the idea for this masterfully carved melon from a photo of a lonely boat with a cormorant standing on the bow. Want to learn Jimmy's skill? Check out his classes at Art Chef Inc. in the San Francisco Bay Area.


Artists in the Kitchen: Outrageous Food Art

You won't find a paintbrush in Jason Mecier's studio. The mosaic portrait artist's representations of famous faces &mdash including Rosie O'Donnell (at left), Rachael Ray, and Jerry Seinfeld &mdash are made out of candy, potato chips, cookies, and other edible goodies.

During the 2012 election season, Industry of the Ordinary, an organization consisting of artists Adam Brooks and Mathew Wilson, hired artist Bob Kling to carve this bust of President Obama out of unsalted butter. The sculpture was displayed in the President's hometown, Chicago, IL.

Montreal-based artist and film director Cosimo Cavallaro works in many mediums. He's created artistic forms and installations with everything from cheese to ham to candy, but some of his most classical looking pieces are made from chocolate. This sculpture, a piece from his "Sweet Saints" collection, depicts an angel-like figure of incredible detail it's sculpted entirely out of pure chocolate.

A piece that creates meaning through whimsical self-reference, this sculpture of an avid movie-goer is made mainly of a beloved movie theater snack &mdash popcorn.

From a distance, you'd never guess that this incredibly detailed mural is made entirely out of frosting and sugar decorations. But artist Shelley Miller, based in Montreal, travels around the globe creating installations like the edible one pictured here. Many of her pieces are commissioned to enliven public spaces &mdash this particular work was created in March of 2011 on a wall in downtown Victoria, BC.

Most of us think of stains as something that ruin a good tablecloth or favorite dress. But Amelia Fais Harnas turns that preconceived notion on its head, and creates truly amazing art by staining fabrics with red wine. This self-portrait, in which the artist depicts herself drinking a delightful glass of vino, is particularly intimate and detailed. Harnas used a Damiani Vino Rosso, as well as bronze powder and acrylic, to create this image on a piece of cotton fabric.

Kevin Van Aelst constructs unique and provocative pieces out of a wide variety of ordinary, everyday materials, but his works in food are some of his most stunning. This globe, carved out of a common Red Delicious apple, is extraordinarly intricate. It's his ability to take commonplace objects and materials and turn them into something spectacular that makes Kevin Van Aelst's work so appealing.

San Francisco-based artist Jason Mecier &mdash who also made the amazing mosaic portrait of Rosie O'Donnell featured in this collection &mdash is continually coming up with clever new ways to depict our favorite figures in American pop culture. This image of Kevin Bacon is made entirely out of &mdash you guessed it &mdash bacon.

It took more than 250 molds to create this Jell-O geography project in August 2009. To make their showstopping map, designers Bompas & Parr borrowed architectural techniques used to design skyscrapers and tapped into their prior masterpieces: glow-in-the-dark creations and wedding jelly molds.

To create his incredible landscapes, Carl Warner's medium of choice is fruits and vegetables. Fruit Balloons and Cart was inspired by the English countryside and created for a UK supermarket.

This self-taught food sculptor could win a gold medal for patience. Just one squash in his Tempo di Zucche took more than five hours to carve using one carving tool: a stiletto Thai knife.

For 30-year veteran food sculptor Jim Victor, creating the Peanut Brittle House was a piece of, well, almost anything but cake. The sculpted house has peanut brittle walls, fruit roll-up roofing applied with chocolate "cement," licorice candy chimneys, cast sugar windows, taffy mullions, licorice candy steps, fondant doors and shutters, and gumdrop, Gummi bear, and rock candy bushes.

Jimmy Zhang, a graduate of the Culinary Arts Institute in China, has always been fascinated by the ancient art of fruit and vegetable carving. He got the idea for this masterfully carved melon from a photo of a lonely boat with a cormorant standing on the bow. Want to learn Jimmy's skill? Check out his classes at Art Chef Inc. in the San Francisco Bay Area.


Artists in the Kitchen: Outrageous Food Art

You won't find a paintbrush in Jason Mecier's studio. The mosaic portrait artist's representations of famous faces &mdash including Rosie O'Donnell (at left), Rachael Ray, and Jerry Seinfeld &mdash are made out of candy, potato chips, cookies, and other edible goodies.

During the 2012 election season, Industry of the Ordinary, an organization consisting of artists Adam Brooks and Mathew Wilson, hired artist Bob Kling to carve this bust of President Obama out of unsalted butter. The sculpture was displayed in the President's hometown, Chicago, IL.

Montreal-based artist and film director Cosimo Cavallaro works in many mediums. He's created artistic forms and installations with everything from cheese to ham to candy, but some of his most classical looking pieces are made from chocolate. This sculpture, a piece from his "Sweet Saints" collection, depicts an angel-like figure of incredible detail it's sculpted entirely out of pure chocolate.

A piece that creates meaning through whimsical self-reference, this sculpture of an avid movie-goer is made mainly of a beloved movie theater snack &mdash popcorn.

From a distance, you'd never guess that this incredibly detailed mural is made entirely out of frosting and sugar decorations. But artist Shelley Miller, based in Montreal, travels around the globe creating installations like the edible one pictured here. Many of her pieces are commissioned to enliven public spaces &mdash this particular work was created in March of 2011 on a wall in downtown Victoria, BC.

Most of us think of stains as something that ruin a good tablecloth or favorite dress. But Amelia Fais Harnas turns that preconceived notion on its head, and creates truly amazing art by staining fabrics with red wine. This self-portrait, in which the artist depicts herself drinking a delightful glass of vino, is particularly intimate and detailed. Harnas used a Damiani Vino Rosso, as well as bronze powder and acrylic, to create this image on a piece of cotton fabric.

Kevin Van Aelst constructs unique and provocative pieces out of a wide variety of ordinary, everyday materials, but his works in food are some of his most stunning. This globe, carved out of a common Red Delicious apple, is extraordinarly intricate. It's his ability to take commonplace objects and materials and turn them into something spectacular that makes Kevin Van Aelst's work so appealing.

San Francisco-based artist Jason Mecier &mdash who also made the amazing mosaic portrait of Rosie O'Donnell featured in this collection &mdash is continually coming up with clever new ways to depict our favorite figures in American pop culture. This image of Kevin Bacon is made entirely out of &mdash you guessed it &mdash bacon.

It took more than 250 molds to create this Jell-O geography project in August 2009. To make their showstopping map, designers Bompas & Parr borrowed architectural techniques used to design skyscrapers and tapped into their prior masterpieces: glow-in-the-dark creations and wedding jelly molds.

To create his incredible landscapes, Carl Warner's medium of choice is fruits and vegetables. Fruit Balloons and Cart was inspired by the English countryside and created for a UK supermarket.

This self-taught food sculptor could win a gold medal for patience. Just one squash in his Tempo di Zucche took more than five hours to carve using one carving tool: a stiletto Thai knife.

For 30-year veteran food sculptor Jim Victor, creating the Peanut Brittle House was a piece of, well, almost anything but cake. The sculpted house has peanut brittle walls, fruit roll-up roofing applied with chocolate "cement," licorice candy chimneys, cast sugar windows, taffy mullions, licorice candy steps, fondant doors and shutters, and gumdrop, Gummi bear, and rock candy bushes.

Jimmy Zhang, a graduate of the Culinary Arts Institute in China, has always been fascinated by the ancient art of fruit and vegetable carving. He got the idea for this masterfully carved melon from a photo of a lonely boat with a cormorant standing on the bow. Want to learn Jimmy's skill? Check out his classes at Art Chef Inc. in the San Francisco Bay Area.


Artists in the Kitchen: Outrageous Food Art

You won't find a paintbrush in Jason Mecier's studio. The mosaic portrait artist's representations of famous faces &mdash including Rosie O'Donnell (at left), Rachael Ray, and Jerry Seinfeld &mdash are made out of candy, potato chips, cookies, and other edible goodies.

During the 2012 election season, Industry of the Ordinary, an organization consisting of artists Adam Brooks and Mathew Wilson, hired artist Bob Kling to carve this bust of President Obama out of unsalted butter. The sculpture was displayed in the President's hometown, Chicago, IL.

Montreal-based artist and film director Cosimo Cavallaro works in many mediums. He's created artistic forms and installations with everything from cheese to ham to candy, but some of his most classical looking pieces are made from chocolate. This sculpture, a piece from his "Sweet Saints" collection, depicts an angel-like figure of incredible detail it's sculpted entirely out of pure chocolate.

A piece that creates meaning through whimsical self-reference, this sculpture of an avid movie-goer is made mainly of a beloved movie theater snack &mdash popcorn.

From a distance, you'd never guess that this incredibly detailed mural is made entirely out of frosting and sugar decorations. But artist Shelley Miller, based in Montreal, travels around the globe creating installations like the edible one pictured here. Many of her pieces are commissioned to enliven public spaces &mdash this particular work was created in March of 2011 on a wall in downtown Victoria, BC.

Most of us think of stains as something that ruin a good tablecloth or favorite dress. But Amelia Fais Harnas turns that preconceived notion on its head, and creates truly amazing art by staining fabrics with red wine. This self-portrait, in which the artist depicts herself drinking a delightful glass of vino, is particularly intimate and detailed. Harnas used a Damiani Vino Rosso, as well as bronze powder and acrylic, to create this image on a piece of cotton fabric.

Kevin Van Aelst constructs unique and provocative pieces out of a wide variety of ordinary, everyday materials, but his works in food are some of his most stunning. This globe, carved out of a common Red Delicious apple, is extraordinarly intricate. It's his ability to take commonplace objects and materials and turn them into something spectacular that makes Kevin Van Aelst's work so appealing.

San Francisco-based artist Jason Mecier &mdash who also made the amazing mosaic portrait of Rosie O'Donnell featured in this collection &mdash is continually coming up with clever new ways to depict our favorite figures in American pop culture. This image of Kevin Bacon is made entirely out of &mdash you guessed it &mdash bacon.

It took more than 250 molds to create this Jell-O geography project in August 2009. To make their showstopping map, designers Bompas & Parr borrowed architectural techniques used to design skyscrapers and tapped into their prior masterpieces: glow-in-the-dark creations and wedding jelly molds.

To create his incredible landscapes, Carl Warner's medium of choice is fruits and vegetables. Fruit Balloons and Cart was inspired by the English countryside and created for a UK supermarket.

This self-taught food sculptor could win a gold medal for patience. Just one squash in his Tempo di Zucche took more than five hours to carve using one carving tool: a stiletto Thai knife.

For 30-year veteran food sculptor Jim Victor, creating the Peanut Brittle House was a piece of, well, almost anything but cake. The sculpted house has peanut brittle walls, fruit roll-up roofing applied with chocolate "cement," licorice candy chimneys, cast sugar windows, taffy mullions, licorice candy steps, fondant doors and shutters, and gumdrop, Gummi bear, and rock candy bushes.

Jimmy Zhang, a graduate of the Culinary Arts Institute in China, has always been fascinated by the ancient art of fruit and vegetable carving. He got the idea for this masterfully carved melon from a photo of a lonely boat with a cormorant standing on the bow. Want to learn Jimmy's skill? Check out his classes at Art Chef Inc. in the San Francisco Bay Area.


Artists in the Kitchen: Outrageous Food Art

You won't find a paintbrush in Jason Mecier's studio. The mosaic portrait artist's representations of famous faces &mdash including Rosie O'Donnell (at left), Rachael Ray, and Jerry Seinfeld &mdash are made out of candy, potato chips, cookies, and other edible goodies.

During the 2012 election season, Industry of the Ordinary, an organization consisting of artists Adam Brooks and Mathew Wilson, hired artist Bob Kling to carve this bust of President Obama out of unsalted butter. The sculpture was displayed in the President's hometown, Chicago, IL.

Montreal-based artist and film director Cosimo Cavallaro works in many mediums. He's created artistic forms and installations with everything from cheese to ham to candy, but some of his most classical looking pieces are made from chocolate. This sculpture, a piece from his "Sweet Saints" collection, depicts an angel-like figure of incredible detail it's sculpted entirely out of pure chocolate.

A piece that creates meaning through whimsical self-reference, this sculpture of an avid movie-goer is made mainly of a beloved movie theater snack &mdash popcorn.

From a distance, you'd never guess that this incredibly detailed mural is made entirely out of frosting and sugar decorations. But artist Shelley Miller, based in Montreal, travels around the globe creating installations like the edible one pictured here. Many of her pieces are commissioned to enliven public spaces &mdash this particular work was created in March of 2011 on a wall in downtown Victoria, BC.

Most of us think of stains as something that ruin a good tablecloth or favorite dress. But Amelia Fais Harnas turns that preconceived notion on its head, and creates truly amazing art by staining fabrics with red wine. This self-portrait, in which the artist depicts herself drinking a delightful glass of vino, is particularly intimate and detailed. Harnas used a Damiani Vino Rosso, as well as bronze powder and acrylic, to create this image on a piece of cotton fabric.

Kevin Van Aelst constructs unique and provocative pieces out of a wide variety of ordinary, everyday materials, but his works in food are some of his most stunning. This globe, carved out of a common Red Delicious apple, is extraordinarly intricate. It's his ability to take commonplace objects and materials and turn them into something spectacular that makes Kevin Van Aelst's work so appealing.

San Francisco-based artist Jason Mecier &mdash who also made the amazing mosaic portrait of Rosie O'Donnell featured in this collection &mdash is continually coming up with clever new ways to depict our favorite figures in American pop culture. This image of Kevin Bacon is made entirely out of &mdash you guessed it &mdash bacon.

It took more than 250 molds to create this Jell-O geography project in August 2009. To make their showstopping map, designers Bompas & Parr borrowed architectural techniques used to design skyscrapers and tapped into their prior masterpieces: glow-in-the-dark creations and wedding jelly molds.

To create his incredible landscapes, Carl Warner's medium of choice is fruits and vegetables. Fruit Balloons and Cart was inspired by the English countryside and created for a UK supermarket.

This self-taught food sculptor could win a gold medal for patience. Just one squash in his Tempo di Zucche took more than five hours to carve using one carving tool: a stiletto Thai knife.

For 30-year veteran food sculptor Jim Victor, creating the Peanut Brittle House was a piece of, well, almost anything but cake. The sculpted house has peanut brittle walls, fruit roll-up roofing applied with chocolate "cement," licorice candy chimneys, cast sugar windows, taffy mullions, licorice candy steps, fondant doors and shutters, and gumdrop, Gummi bear, and rock candy bushes.

Jimmy Zhang, a graduate of the Culinary Arts Institute in China, has always been fascinated by the ancient art of fruit and vegetable carving. He got the idea for this masterfully carved melon from a photo of a lonely boat with a cormorant standing on the bow. Want to learn Jimmy's skill? Check out his classes at Art Chef Inc. in the San Francisco Bay Area.


Artists in the Kitchen: Outrageous Food Art

You won't find a paintbrush in Jason Mecier's studio. The mosaic portrait artist's representations of famous faces &mdash including Rosie O'Donnell (at left), Rachael Ray, and Jerry Seinfeld &mdash are made out of candy, potato chips, cookies, and other edible goodies.

During the 2012 election season, Industry of the Ordinary, an organization consisting of artists Adam Brooks and Mathew Wilson, hired artist Bob Kling to carve this bust of President Obama out of unsalted butter. The sculpture was displayed in the President's hometown, Chicago, IL.

Montreal-based artist and film director Cosimo Cavallaro works in many mediums. He's created artistic forms and installations with everything from cheese to ham to candy, but some of his most classical looking pieces are made from chocolate. This sculpture, a piece from his "Sweet Saints" collection, depicts an angel-like figure of incredible detail it's sculpted entirely out of pure chocolate.

A piece that creates meaning through whimsical self-reference, this sculpture of an avid movie-goer is made mainly of a beloved movie theater snack &mdash popcorn.

From a distance, you'd never guess that this incredibly detailed mural is made entirely out of frosting and sugar decorations. But artist Shelley Miller, based in Montreal, travels around the globe creating installations like the edible one pictured here. Many of her pieces are commissioned to enliven public spaces &mdash this particular work was created in March of 2011 on a wall in downtown Victoria, BC.

Most of us think of stains as something that ruin a good tablecloth or favorite dress. But Amelia Fais Harnas turns that preconceived notion on its head, and creates truly amazing art by staining fabrics with red wine. This self-portrait, in which the artist depicts herself drinking a delightful glass of vino, is particularly intimate and detailed. Harnas used a Damiani Vino Rosso, as well as bronze powder and acrylic, to create this image on a piece of cotton fabric.

Kevin Van Aelst constructs unique and provocative pieces out of a wide variety of ordinary, everyday materials, but his works in food are some of his most stunning. This globe, carved out of a common Red Delicious apple, is extraordinarly intricate. It's his ability to take commonplace objects and materials and turn them into something spectacular that makes Kevin Van Aelst's work so appealing.

San Francisco-based artist Jason Mecier &mdash who also made the amazing mosaic portrait of Rosie O'Donnell featured in this collection &mdash is continually coming up with clever new ways to depict our favorite figures in American pop culture. This image of Kevin Bacon is made entirely out of &mdash you guessed it &mdash bacon.

It took more than 250 molds to create this Jell-O geography project in August 2009. To make their showstopping map, designers Bompas & Parr borrowed architectural techniques used to design skyscrapers and tapped into their prior masterpieces: glow-in-the-dark creations and wedding jelly molds.

To create his incredible landscapes, Carl Warner's medium of choice is fruits and vegetables. Fruit Balloons and Cart was inspired by the English countryside and created for a UK supermarket.

This self-taught food sculptor could win a gold medal for patience. Just one squash in his Tempo di Zucche took more than five hours to carve using one carving tool: a stiletto Thai knife.

For 30-year veteran food sculptor Jim Victor, creating the Peanut Brittle House was a piece of, well, almost anything but cake. The sculpted house has peanut brittle walls, fruit roll-up roofing applied with chocolate "cement," licorice candy chimneys, cast sugar windows, taffy mullions, licorice candy steps, fondant doors and shutters, and gumdrop, Gummi bear, and rock candy bushes.

Jimmy Zhang, a graduate of the Culinary Arts Institute in China, has always been fascinated by the ancient art of fruit and vegetable carving. He got the idea for this masterfully carved melon from a photo of a lonely boat with a cormorant standing on the bow. Want to learn Jimmy's skill? Check out his classes at Art Chef Inc. in the San Francisco Bay Area.


Artists in the Kitchen: Outrageous Food Art

You won't find a paintbrush in Jason Mecier's studio. The mosaic portrait artist's representations of famous faces &mdash including Rosie O'Donnell (at left), Rachael Ray, and Jerry Seinfeld &mdash are made out of candy, potato chips, cookies, and other edible goodies.

During the 2012 election season, Industry of the Ordinary, an organization consisting of artists Adam Brooks and Mathew Wilson, hired artist Bob Kling to carve this bust of President Obama out of unsalted butter. The sculpture was displayed in the President's hometown, Chicago, IL.

Montreal-based artist and film director Cosimo Cavallaro works in many mediums. He's created artistic forms and installations with everything from cheese to ham to candy, but some of his most classical looking pieces are made from chocolate. This sculpture, a piece from his "Sweet Saints" collection, depicts an angel-like figure of incredible detail it's sculpted entirely out of pure chocolate.

A piece that creates meaning through whimsical self-reference, this sculpture of an avid movie-goer is made mainly of a beloved movie theater snack &mdash popcorn.

From a distance, you'd never guess that this incredibly detailed mural is made entirely out of frosting and sugar decorations. But artist Shelley Miller, based in Montreal, travels around the globe creating installations like the edible one pictured here. Many of her pieces are commissioned to enliven public spaces &mdash this particular work was created in March of 2011 on a wall in downtown Victoria, BC.

Most of us think of stains as something that ruin a good tablecloth or favorite dress. But Amelia Fais Harnas turns that preconceived notion on its head, and creates truly amazing art by staining fabrics with red wine. This self-portrait, in which the artist depicts herself drinking a delightful glass of vino, is particularly intimate and detailed. Harnas used a Damiani Vino Rosso, as well as bronze powder and acrylic, to create this image on a piece of cotton fabric.

Kevin Van Aelst constructs unique and provocative pieces out of a wide variety of ordinary, everyday materials, but his works in food are some of his most stunning. This globe, carved out of a common Red Delicious apple, is extraordinarly intricate. It's his ability to take commonplace objects and materials and turn them into something spectacular that makes Kevin Van Aelst's work so appealing.

San Francisco-based artist Jason Mecier &mdash who also made the amazing mosaic portrait of Rosie O'Donnell featured in this collection &mdash is continually coming up with clever new ways to depict our favorite figures in American pop culture. This image of Kevin Bacon is made entirely out of &mdash you guessed it &mdash bacon.

It took more than 250 molds to create this Jell-O geography project in August 2009. To make their showstopping map, designers Bompas & Parr borrowed architectural techniques used to design skyscrapers and tapped into their prior masterpieces: glow-in-the-dark creations and wedding jelly molds.

To create his incredible landscapes, Carl Warner's medium of choice is fruits and vegetables. Fruit Balloons and Cart was inspired by the English countryside and created for a UK supermarket.

This self-taught food sculptor could win a gold medal for patience. Just one squash in his Tempo di Zucche took more than five hours to carve using one carving tool: a stiletto Thai knife.

For 30-year veteran food sculptor Jim Victor, creating the Peanut Brittle House was a piece of, well, almost anything but cake. The sculpted house has peanut brittle walls, fruit roll-up roofing applied with chocolate "cement," licorice candy chimneys, cast sugar windows, taffy mullions, licorice candy steps, fondant doors and shutters, and gumdrop, Gummi bear, and rock candy bushes.

Jimmy Zhang, a graduate of the Culinary Arts Institute in China, has always been fascinated by the ancient art of fruit and vegetable carving. He got the idea for this masterfully carved melon from a photo of a lonely boat with a cormorant standing on the bow. Want to learn Jimmy's skill? Check out his classes at Art Chef Inc. in the San Francisco Bay Area.


Artists in the Kitchen: Outrageous Food Art

You won't find a paintbrush in Jason Mecier's studio. The mosaic portrait artist's representations of famous faces &mdash including Rosie O'Donnell (at left), Rachael Ray, and Jerry Seinfeld &mdash are made out of candy, potato chips, cookies, and other edible goodies.

During the 2012 election season, Industry of the Ordinary, an organization consisting of artists Adam Brooks and Mathew Wilson, hired artist Bob Kling to carve this bust of President Obama out of unsalted butter. The sculpture was displayed in the President's hometown, Chicago, IL.

Montreal-based artist and film director Cosimo Cavallaro works in many mediums. He's created artistic forms and installations with everything from cheese to ham to candy, but some of his most classical looking pieces are made from chocolate. This sculpture, a piece from his "Sweet Saints" collection, depicts an angel-like figure of incredible detail it's sculpted entirely out of pure chocolate.

A piece that creates meaning through whimsical self-reference, this sculpture of an avid movie-goer is made mainly of a beloved movie theater snack &mdash popcorn.

From a distance, you'd never guess that this incredibly detailed mural is made entirely out of frosting and sugar decorations. But artist Shelley Miller, based in Montreal, travels around the globe creating installations like the edible one pictured here. Many of her pieces are commissioned to enliven public spaces &mdash this particular work was created in March of 2011 on a wall in downtown Victoria, BC.

Most of us think of stains as something that ruin a good tablecloth or favorite dress. But Amelia Fais Harnas turns that preconceived notion on its head, and creates truly amazing art by staining fabrics with red wine. This self-portrait, in which the artist depicts herself drinking a delightful glass of vino, is particularly intimate and detailed. Harnas used a Damiani Vino Rosso, as well as bronze powder and acrylic, to create this image on a piece of cotton fabric.

Kevin Van Aelst constructs unique and provocative pieces out of a wide variety of ordinary, everyday materials, but his works in food are some of his most stunning. This globe, carved out of a common Red Delicious apple, is extraordinarly intricate. It's his ability to take commonplace objects and materials and turn them into something spectacular that makes Kevin Van Aelst's work so appealing.

San Francisco-based artist Jason Mecier &mdash who also made the amazing mosaic portrait of Rosie O'Donnell featured in this collection &mdash is continually coming up with clever new ways to depict our favorite figures in American pop culture. This image of Kevin Bacon is made entirely out of &mdash you guessed it &mdash bacon.

It took more than 250 molds to create this Jell-O geography project in August 2009. To make their showstopping map, designers Bompas & Parr borrowed architectural techniques used to design skyscrapers and tapped into their prior masterpieces: glow-in-the-dark creations and wedding jelly molds.

To create his incredible landscapes, Carl Warner's medium of choice is fruits and vegetables. Fruit Balloons and Cart was inspired by the English countryside and created for a UK supermarket.

This self-taught food sculptor could win a gold medal for patience. Just one squash in his Tempo di Zucche took more than five hours to carve using one carving tool: a stiletto Thai knife.

For 30-year veteran food sculptor Jim Victor, creating the Peanut Brittle House was a piece of, well, almost anything but cake. The sculpted house has peanut brittle walls, fruit roll-up roofing applied with chocolate "cement," licorice candy chimneys, cast sugar windows, taffy mullions, licorice candy steps, fondant doors and shutters, and gumdrop, Gummi bear, and rock candy bushes.

Jimmy Zhang, a graduate of the Culinary Arts Institute in China, has always been fascinated by the ancient art of fruit and vegetable carving. He got the idea for this masterfully carved melon from a photo of a lonely boat with a cormorant standing on the bow. Want to learn Jimmy's skill? Check out his classes at Art Chef Inc. in the San Francisco Bay Area.


Artists in the Kitchen: Outrageous Food Art

You won't find a paintbrush in Jason Mecier's studio. The mosaic portrait artist's representations of famous faces &mdash including Rosie O'Donnell (at left), Rachael Ray, and Jerry Seinfeld &mdash are made out of candy, potato chips, cookies, and other edible goodies.

During the 2012 election season, Industry of the Ordinary, an organization consisting of artists Adam Brooks and Mathew Wilson, hired artist Bob Kling to carve this bust of President Obama out of unsalted butter. The sculpture was displayed in the President's hometown, Chicago, IL.

Montreal-based artist and film director Cosimo Cavallaro works in many mediums. He's created artistic forms and installations with everything from cheese to ham to candy, but some of his most classical looking pieces are made from chocolate. This sculpture, a piece from his "Sweet Saints" collection, depicts an angel-like figure of incredible detail it's sculpted entirely out of pure chocolate.

A piece that creates meaning through whimsical self-reference, this sculpture of an avid movie-goer is made mainly of a beloved movie theater snack &mdash popcorn.

From a distance, you'd never guess that this incredibly detailed mural is made entirely out of frosting and sugar decorations. But artist Shelley Miller, based in Montreal, travels around the globe creating installations like the edible one pictured here. Many of her pieces are commissioned to enliven public spaces &mdash this particular work was created in March of 2011 on a wall in downtown Victoria, BC.

Most of us think of stains as something that ruin a good tablecloth or favorite dress. But Amelia Fais Harnas turns that preconceived notion on its head, and creates truly amazing art by staining fabrics with red wine. This self-portrait, in which the artist depicts herself drinking a delightful glass of vino, is particularly intimate and detailed. Harnas used a Damiani Vino Rosso, as well as bronze powder and acrylic, to create this image on a piece of cotton fabric.

Kevin Van Aelst constructs unique and provocative pieces out of a wide variety of ordinary, everyday materials, but his works in food are some of his most stunning. This globe, carved out of a common Red Delicious apple, is extraordinarly intricate. It's his ability to take commonplace objects and materials and turn them into something spectacular that makes Kevin Van Aelst's work so appealing.

San Francisco-based artist Jason Mecier &mdash who also made the amazing mosaic portrait of Rosie O'Donnell featured in this collection &mdash is continually coming up with clever new ways to depict our favorite figures in American pop culture. This image of Kevin Bacon is made entirely out of &mdash you guessed it &mdash bacon.

It took more than 250 molds to create this Jell-O geography project in August 2009. To make their showstopping map, designers Bompas & Parr borrowed architectural techniques used to design skyscrapers and tapped into their prior masterpieces: glow-in-the-dark creations and wedding jelly molds.

To create his incredible landscapes, Carl Warner's medium of choice is fruits and vegetables. Fruit Balloons and Cart was inspired by the English countryside and created for a UK supermarket.

This self-taught food sculptor could win a gold medal for patience. Just one squash in his Tempo di Zucche took more than five hours to carve using one carving tool: a stiletto Thai knife.

For 30-year veteran food sculptor Jim Victor, creating the Peanut Brittle House was a piece of, well, almost anything but cake. The sculpted house has peanut brittle walls, fruit roll-up roofing applied with chocolate "cement," licorice candy chimneys, cast sugar windows, taffy mullions, licorice candy steps, fondant doors and shutters, and gumdrop, Gummi bear, and rock candy bushes.

Jimmy Zhang, a graduate of the Culinary Arts Institute in China, has always been fascinated by the ancient art of fruit and vegetable carving. He got the idea for this masterfully carved melon from a photo of a lonely boat with a cormorant standing on the bow. Want to learn Jimmy's skill? Check out his classes at Art Chef Inc. in the San Francisco Bay Area.


Artists in the Kitchen: Outrageous Food Art

You won't find a paintbrush in Jason Mecier's studio. The mosaic portrait artist's representations of famous faces &mdash including Rosie O'Donnell (at left), Rachael Ray, and Jerry Seinfeld &mdash are made out of candy, potato chips, cookies, and other edible goodies.

During the 2012 election season, Industry of the Ordinary, an organization consisting of artists Adam Brooks and Mathew Wilson, hired artist Bob Kling to carve this bust of President Obama out of unsalted butter. The sculpture was displayed in the President's hometown, Chicago, IL.

Montreal-based artist and film director Cosimo Cavallaro works in many mediums. He's created artistic forms and installations with everything from cheese to ham to candy, but some of his most classical looking pieces are made from chocolate. This sculpture, a piece from his "Sweet Saints" collection, depicts an angel-like figure of incredible detail it's sculpted entirely out of pure chocolate.

A piece that creates meaning through whimsical self-reference, this sculpture of an avid movie-goer is made mainly of a beloved movie theater snack &mdash popcorn.

From a distance, you'd never guess that this incredibly detailed mural is made entirely out of frosting and sugar decorations. But artist Shelley Miller, based in Montreal, travels around the globe creating installations like the edible one pictured here. Many of her pieces are commissioned to enliven public spaces &mdash this particular work was created in March of 2011 on a wall in downtown Victoria, BC.

Most of us think of stains as something that ruin a good tablecloth or favorite dress. But Amelia Fais Harnas turns that preconceived notion on its head, and creates truly amazing art by staining fabrics with red wine. This self-portrait, in which the artist depicts herself drinking a delightful glass of vino, is particularly intimate and detailed. Harnas used a Damiani Vino Rosso, as well as bronze powder and acrylic, to create this image on a piece of cotton fabric.

Kevin Van Aelst constructs unique and provocative pieces out of a wide variety of ordinary, everyday materials, but his works in food are some of his most stunning. This globe, carved out of a common Red Delicious apple, is extraordinarly intricate. It's his ability to take commonplace objects and materials and turn them into something spectacular that makes Kevin Van Aelst's work so appealing.

San Francisco-based artist Jason Mecier &mdash who also made the amazing mosaic portrait of Rosie O'Donnell featured in this collection &mdash is continually coming up with clever new ways to depict our favorite figures in American pop culture. This image of Kevin Bacon is made entirely out of &mdash you guessed it &mdash bacon.

It took more than 250 molds to create this Jell-O geography project in August 2009. To make their showstopping map, designers Bompas & Parr borrowed architectural techniques used to design skyscrapers and tapped into their prior masterpieces: glow-in-the-dark creations and wedding jelly molds.

To create his incredible landscapes, Carl Warner's medium of choice is fruits and vegetables. Fruit Balloons and Cart was inspired by the English countryside and created for a UK supermarket.

This self-taught food sculptor could win a gold medal for patience. Just one squash in his Tempo di Zucche took more than five hours to carve using one carving tool: a stiletto Thai knife.

For 30-year veteran food sculptor Jim Victor, creating the Peanut Brittle House was a piece of, well, almost anything but cake. The sculpted house has peanut brittle walls, fruit roll-up roofing applied with chocolate "cement," licorice candy chimneys, cast sugar windows, taffy mullions, licorice candy steps, fondant doors and shutters, and gumdrop, Gummi bear, and rock candy bushes.

Jimmy Zhang, a graduate of the Culinary Arts Institute in China, has always been fascinated by the ancient art of fruit and vegetable carving. He got the idea for this masterfully carved melon from a photo of a lonely boat with a cormorant standing on the bow. Want to learn Jimmy's skill? Check out his classes at Art Chef Inc. in the San Francisco Bay Area.


Watch the video: πίνακες διάσημων ζωγράφων μετά μουσικής! (January 2022).